More Jerusalem Photos and a note on Travel Posts in general

I still haven`t quite finished my blog about Israel, but I deliberately spaced this out a bit recently, as I was quite conscious that this blog was starting to look like a travel blog. My intention was always (and still is!) to write about quite a varied range of topics, but I`m pleased about and flattered by the unexpected interest in my humble holiday snaps.

I would like to (at last!!) take this opportunity to extend an especially warm welcome to over 120 (that`s one hundred and twenty!! :-)) new followers, who came since I started blogging more about travelling, and while I was not going to post more pictures of my 4th stay on Crete and 5th visit to Lisbon, you have changed my mind, and I will! I may even start posting more about Edinburgh, which is where I live. Not all at once, but that`s actually a good thing as it means I`ll not run out of material any time soon. In any case, I herewith promise to please 🙂

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… and here come some more pictures of Jerusalem (and I hope you`ll forgive me for posting them on a day where there is so many sad pictures of this country as well, due to the wildfires. But what this blog never wanted to be is the BBC). It`s Friday now, and, after a rather brief revisit of the Jewish Food Market (NOT recommended on Fridays when everyone is coming to stock up for Sabbath!), I went to have a look at the more modern part of Jerusalem:

Those pretty ornaments here have been photographed and put online numerous times before, and apart from being pretty, they`re also rather useful to provide some shade in this hot climate:

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The headscarves of the Jewish women have been fascinating me ever since I started to notice them. I didn`t even know there was a dress code for girls, and while their actual clothes are rather plain (which is the requirement), their headwear is a piece of art. It`s meant to look modest (because it conceals her hair), but to me, it looks regal, elegant and sophisticated. Sadly, I have not been able to ask anyone to teach me, but I bought a little headband for myself, which is… just a band rather than a proper scarf but, at least in, as well as on, my own head, able to replicate some of the glamour. Sadly, not entirely appropriate for the office. I almost envy those women for wearing them absolutely everywhere.

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Even though this was the modern part of Jerusalem, there was a different feel to it. I can`t quite tell whether this was because of the buildings or because people still did things like selling vegetables and fresh bread in the street…

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At the end of the day I had a less pleasant surprise. Bandora told me, but I had forgotten. When I arrived at the bus stop at 5.30pm, there was no one there but me, and the electronic timetables which reliably told me on all other days when buses were due, were out of service. A passer by reminded me that Sabbath actually starts at 5pm on a Friday, and as the buses were operated by Jews, they were already finished until Sunday morning. Obviously, (Christian) taxi drivers were used to people being caught out, as it did not take long for one to arrive and take me home.

Someone else`s garden:

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BTW, Muslims stop working at lunch time on Fridays (I desperately wanted to visit the Islamic Arts Museum but didn’t watch my time). Jews don`t work a Saturday, and Christian shops are closed on Sundays, so my souvenir shopping had to be rather well planned. Being from Germany, I know differently, but here in Britain, we are spoilt: Everything is open every single but two days of the year, which is Christmas Day and New Year, and we now expect it. They are currently trying to pass a law banning winter sales starting on Boxing Day with a view of extending family time that once a year.

Not exactly chronological order, but I saved the best thing for last: lunch in a Jewish Restaurant near the Jewish Food Market. I`ve been stuffing my face with delicious Middle Eastern things all week, but so far, had not had anything which was decidedly Jewish.

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What caught my eye was the last item listed under “first course”, because it said Fridays only. So I asked whether this were vegetarian, and the waiter grabbed my arm and took me to the kitchen to speak to the chef. What I saw there was probably the highlight of my rather full day:

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Isn`t this incredible????? I`ll leave it for another post to show you what happened to my own kitchen after I revisited the idea of mosaic tiles in Portugal a couple of weeks ago (not quite ready yet…)

 

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9 thoughts on “More Jerusalem Photos and a note on Travel Posts in general

    • culbia says:

      Thank you – as you`ve been, you know it really is that beautiful 🙂 (Obviously, out of 1000+ pics, I want to show my own favourites, and although I`m probably already approaching 100, it`s good to hear people saying yes, it really looks like this.)

      Like

    • culbia says:

      I, too, love seeing pictures of places where I`ve been myself, and I actually quite like drawing comparison to how we saw and experienced a place.

      Short time after me, a colleague has been in Prague, for example, but she had a totally different experience of it, because they did completely different things. Her pictures showed a side of this city, that I never saw, and it was probably the same vice versa.

      Like

    • culbia says:

      I think it would work with some styles (Hippies!!) but not with mine. And if you wore a full head dress as a white women, people would probably think you`re having chemotherapy…

      Like

  1. Paleica says:

    wunderschöne tolle bilder von einer bestimmt sehr beeindruckenden stadt, die ich eines tages acuh einmal besuchen will. poste einfach wonach dir ist und versuche, dich nicht zu sehr einzuschränken 😉

    Liked by 1 person

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